Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /srv/psa05/hrmexpertise.nl/subdomains/blog/httpdocs/wp-content/plugins/download-monitor/classes/download_taxonomies.class.php on line 156 Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /srv/psa05/hrmexpertise.nl/subdomains/blog/httpdocs/wp-content/plugins/download-monitor/classes/download_taxonomies.class.php on line 156 Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /srv/psa05/hrmexpertise.nl/subdomains/blog/httpdocs/wp-content/plugins/download-monitor/classes/download_taxonomies.class.php on line 156 Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /srv/psa05/hrmexpertise.nl/subdomains/blog/httpdocs/wp-content/plugins/download-monitor/classes/download_taxonomies.class.php on line 156 Colloquium Pranjal Mehta: The Biology of Bargaining | Expertisecentrum Human Resource Management & Organizational Behavior

Colloquium Pranjal Mehta: The Biology of Bargaining

door Niels van der Kam

Evenement

Op dinsdag 10 mei aanstaande presenteert Pranjal Mehta in de colloquiareeks 2010 – 2011 van het Expertisecentrum. Pranjal Mehta is verbonden aan de Erasmus Universiteit, Rotterdam School of Management. U bent van harte welkom om het colloquium bij te wonen. Het colloquium start om 13:30 in het Zernikegebouw (gebouw 5419, Zernike complex, Groningen). Voor meer informatie neemt u contact op met het secretariaat van de vakgroep Human Resource Management.

Hieronder vindt u een samenvatting van de presentatie van Pranjal Mehta, getiteld: “The Biology of Bargaining: Dynamic Hormone Changes Track Economic Profit in Competitive Negotiations”.

Steroid hormone levels can fluctuate in social interactions, but the economic implications of these biological changes remain unclear. Here we show that dynamic changes in hormones implicated dominance (testosterone) and psychological stress (cortisol) interact to explain economic profit in bargaining interactions.

In a face-to-face competitive negotiation (Study 1) and a laboratory-based bargaining game (the Ultimatum Game, Study 2), testosterone rises during bargaining predicted greater economic profit only if cortisol simultaneously dropped. If cortisol rose during bargaining, testosterone rises were associated with poor economic performance.

The findings suggest that in the absence of psychological stress (cortisol decrease), rising testosterone encourages rational decision-making and the successful pursuit of monetary reward during the bargaining process. If psychological stress is high (cortisol increase), rising testosterone during bargaining may lead to irrational decision-making and economic losses. There is, it seems, a “bright side” and  “dark side” to rising testosterone in economic social interactions that depends on activity in the neuroendocrine stress axis.

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